What to Do With Snail Eggs in Your Aquarium?

Snails are a part of the natural ecosystem of the aquarium so you want to avoid killing them if possible. However, snail eggs can be a cause for alarm for some aquarists. Snails will lay eggs on everything so it’s very easy to mistake them for something more sinister such as diatoms or some form of algae. Luckily, we will cover what they look like and where to find them in this post!

What Do Snail Eggs Look Like?

What Do Snail Eggs Look Like

Each freshwater snail species lays unique eggs that are distinct and identifiable. So, the exact look of the eggs will depend entirely on the snail species you have.

During the process of egg development, snail eggs go through different stages. The shell solidifies around 5 days after they are laid, and the shell begins growing. Now, the egg is attached to the shell, and the shell is growing, too.

After about 7 days of egg development, the snail shells are fully formed, and the snail eggs have hatched. If you are lucky enough to notice this, then the egg shells will look different from one species to the next.

The shells of the snail eggs may be smooth and round, or they may have ridges, bumps or “warts” on them. Depending on the species, the shells may be transparent, white, or transparent with random spots of white.

The snail eggs are designed to look like the adult snail. For example, the snail eggs of Somegia abdita are shaped to look similar to the adult snail’s shell.

If the egg shells are transparent, they are usually white. Some snails have red shells that are transparent. The snail eggs of Criorhina turrita, on the other hand, are “warty”-looking. The shell of the snail egg is covered in small bumps and warts. The shapes of the snail eggs are actually determined by where the snail lays them. Some snails lay their eggs on flat rocks, while others lay them on plant leaves.

How Do Snails Reproduce?

Snails reproduce through asexual (hermaphroditic) means, but they can also reproduce sexually. Asexual reproduction is primarily the result of mucus and bacteria. Snails secrete mucus that contains a bacteria, which, when ingested by the other snail, causes reproductive organs to develop. Snails can also reproduce sexually, though they don’t produce very many eggs.

Some snail species reproduce asexually. These species aren’t as common in gardens, because their mucus (and bacteria) isn’t as strong. For the most part, when snails reproduce asexually, the bacteria in the mucus don’t cause reproductive organs to develop, so snails produce only a few hundred eggs.

Snails that reproduce sexually can lay hundreds of eggs at a time. They lay their eggs in moist, protected places, like under logs or stones. The eggs are fertilized by the male, and, if conditions are right, they hatch into juvenile snails.

Where Snails Usually Lay Their Eggs?

Snails lay their eggs in moist, shady areas, and they prefer to hide them under leaves. If you’re growing plants in your tank, you’re likely to find a snail or two scurrying around. They like to hide in dark, moist areas, but they’re also attracted to light. If you’re growing floating plants or plants with large leaves, you’re more likely to find eggs underneath than on leaves.

The eggs may look like small white or transparent pellets and appear under leaves, in gravel, or in dense grasses, although snails and mollusks can lay their eggs in just about any place.

Snail eggs usually hatch within 48 hours. The tadpoles crawl out of the egg and begin feeding immediately. They change into miniature versions of the adult snails in about one month.

If you’re growing plants in your tank, you’ll probably notice snails or snails eggs at some point in your growing process.

Snails don’t produce very many eggs, so once you’re aware of their presence, you can hand-pick the eggs and remove them from the plant. Or you can vacuum them up with a small siphon or siphon hose.

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If you’ve noticed snails in your tank, it’s important to remove them immediately to prevent an infestation.

If you’re growing plants in your fish tank, you’re likely to find a snail or two scurrying around. They like to hide in dark, moist areas, but they’re also attracted to light. If you’re growing floating plants or plants with large leaves, you’re more likely to find eggs underneath than on leaves.

What To Do With Your Baby Snails And Snail Eggs?

When it happens, you have to decide what to do with the snails and snails eggs. There are a few options:

  1. Hatch the snails and snails eggs.
  2. Use them for feeding.
  3. Disposing of unwanted snails and snails eggs.
  4. Hatch the snails and snails eggs.

What You Can Do With The Snail Eggs?

What You Can Do With The Snail Eggs

Removing eggs is the simplest way to deal with snails. If, however, you have other snail species in your aquarium, you’ll need to figure out how to remove the eggs without killing any members of your snail community.

  1. Watch for eggs. Snails lay eggs in bunches. Usually, there will be about four eggs per bunch, but sometimes there can be more. If you’re watching your snail community closely, you should be able to spot the eggs and remove them easily.
  2. Remove eggs by hand. Once you’ve spotted the eggs, gently remove them from the tank, being careful not to damage them.
  3. Place eggs in an incubator. Snail eggs will hatch in about 72 hours. Place the eggs in a plastic container with a damp paper towel inside. Place it in a warm, dark place.
  4. Put eggs in the trash. Snail eggs can hatch into snails and reproduce, so it’s better to discard them if you can. Snail eggs can be safely disposed of by putting them in a plastic container or bag. Place it outside, away from water, and then throw it away.

How Long Does It Take For Snail Eggs To Hatch?

The egg-laying period of snails ranges from 2 weeks to 8 months, depending on species, environmental conditions, and diet (see references).

The eggs of most species contain about 100 to 200 tiny embryos that slowly develop until hatching. Some species, such as Aplysia, store the eggs in clusters, and the eggs hatch all at once.

In other species, such as Helix, the eggs hatch one at a time, and the mother carries the newly hatched baby snails to her egg-laying site, where another egg is laid. Some species, such as Aplysia, store the eggs in clusters, and the eggs hatch all at once.

The gestation period of eggs varies from one species to the next. Not only that, but environmental conditions can speed up or slow down the process, too. On the lower end of the timeline scale, you might see the eggs hatch in as little as two weeks. Some species, however, can take as long as eight months! Some snails can also hold onto fertilized eggs for several weeks before laying them. As a result, there’s no way to guarantee a hatching timeline.

Conclusion

A snail infestation is rarely anything to be concerned about, but it’s sometimes hard to pinpoint which snails are causing the trouble. Snail eggs, in particular, are notoriously hard to distinguish from snails themselves, so it’s important to clean the tank thoroughly and keep a close eye on the snails to prevent their eggs from hatching.

Snail eggs are white and oval, and in clear water, it’s very easy to identify them as such. As with most fish eggs, snails lay eggs in clumps so they’re fairly easy to remove, but snails do tend to hide their eggs in cracks and crevices, so you have to be diligent about your search to find them.